6 Basic Financial Ratios and What They Reveal (2024)

Ratios track company performance. They can rate and compare one company against another that you might be considering investing in. The term "ratio" conjures up complex and frustrating high school math problems, but that need not be the case. Ratios can help make you a more informed investor when they're properly understood and applied.

Key Takeaways

  • Fundamental analysis relies on data from corporate financial statements to compute various ratios.
  • Fundamental analysis is used to determine a security's intrinsic or true value so it can be compared with the security's market value.
  • There are six basic ratios that are often used to pick stocks for investment portfolios.
  • Ratios include the working capital ratio, the quick ratio, earnings per share (EPS), price-earnings (P/E), debt-to-equity, and return on equity (ROE).
  • Most ratios are best used in combination with others rather than singly to accomplish a comprehensive picture of a company's financial health.

1. Working Capital Ratio

Assessing the health of a company in which you want to invest involves measuring its liquidity. The term liquidity refers to how easily a company can turn assets into cash to pay short-term obligations. The working capital ratio can be useful in helping you measure liquidity. It represents a company'sability to payits current liabilities with its current assets.

Working capitalis the difference between a firm’s current assets and current liabilities: current assets - current liabilities = working capital.

The working capital ratio, like working capital, compares current assets to current liabilities and is a metric used to measure liquidity. The working capital ratio is calculated by dividing current assets by current liabilities: current assets / current liabilities = working capital ratio.

Let's say that XYZ company has current assets of $8 million and current liabilities of $4 million. The working capital ratio is 2 ($8 million / $4 million). That's an indication of healthy short-term liquidity. But what if two similar companies each had ratios of 2? The firm with more cash among its current assets would be able to pay off its debts more quickly than the other.

A working capital ratio of 1 can imply that a company may have liquidity troubles and not be able to pay its short-term liabilities. But the trouble could be temporary and later improve.

A working capital ratio of 2 or higher can indicate healthy liquidity and the ability to pay short-term liabilities, but it could also point to a company that has too much in short-term assets such as cash. Some of these assets might be better used to invest in the company or to pay shareholder dividends.

It can be a challenge to determine the proper category for the vast array of assets and liabilities on a corporatebalance sheetto decipher the overall ability of a firm to meet its short-term commitments.

2. Quick Ratio

The quick ratio is also called the acid test. It's another measure of liquidity. It represents a company's ability to pay current liabilities with assets that can be converted to cash quickly.

The calculation for the quick ratio is current assets - inventory prepaid expenses / current liabilities (current assets minus inventory minus prepaid expenses divided by current liabilities). The formula removes inventory because it can take time to sell and convert inventory into liquid assets.

XYZ company has $8 million in current assets, $2 million in inventory and prepaid expenses, and $4 million in current liabilities. That means the quick ratio is 1.5 ($8 million - $2 million / $4 million). It indicates that the company has enough to money to pay its bills and continue operating.

A quick ratio of less than 1 can indicate that there aren't enough liquid assets to pay short-term liabilities. The company may have to raise capital or take other actions. On the other hand, it may be a temporary situation.

3. Earnings Per Share (EPS)

When buying a stock, you participate in the future earnings or the risk of loss of the company. Earnings per share (EPS) is a measure of the profitability of a company. Investors use it to gain an understanding of company value.

The company's analysts calculate EPS by dividing net income by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the year: net income / weighted average = earnings per share. Earnings per share will also be zero or negative if a company has zero earnings or negative earnings representing a loss. A higher EPS indicates greater value.

4. Price-Earnings Ratio (P/E)

Called P/E for short, this ratio is used by investors to determine a stock's potential for growth. It reflects how much they would pay to receive $1 of earnings. It's often used to compare the potential value of a selection of stocks.

To calculate the P/E ratio, divide a company's current stock price by its earnings-per-share to calculate the P/E ratio: current stock price / earning- per-share = price-earnings ratio.

A company's P/E ratio would be 9.49 ($46.51 / $4.90) if it closed trading at $46.51 a share and the EPS for the past 12 months averaged $4.90. Investors would spend $9.49 for every generated dollar of annual earnings. Investors have been willing to pay more than 20 times the EPS for certain stocks when they've felt that a future growth in earnings would give them adequate returns on their investments.

The P/E ratio will no longer make sense if a company has zero or negative earnings. It will appear as N/A for "not applicable."

Ratios can help improve your investing results when they're properly understood and applied.

5. Debt-to-Equity Ratio

What if your prospective investment target is borrowing too much? This can increase fixed charges, reduce earnings available for dividends, and pose a risk to shareholders.

The debt-to-equity (D/E) ratio measures how much a company is funding its operations using borrowed money. It can indicate whether shareholder equity can cover all debts, if necessary. Investors often use it to compare the leverage used by different companies in the same industry. This can help them to determine which might be a lower-risk investment.

Divide total liabilities by total shareholders' equity to calculate the debt-to-equity ratio: total liabilities / total shareholders' equity = debt-to-equity ratio. Let's say that company XYZ has $3.1 million worth of loans and shareholders' equity of $13.3 million. That works out to a modest ratio of 0.23, which is acceptable under most circumstances. But like all other ratios, the metric must be analyzed in terms of industry norms and company-specific requirements.

6. Return on Equity(ROE)

Return on equity (ROE) measures profitability and how effectively a company uses shareholder money to make a profit. ROE is expressed as a percentage of common stock shareholders.

It's calculated by taking net income (income less expenses and taxes) figured before paying common share dividends and after paying preferred share dividends. Divide the result by total shareholders' equity: net income (expenses and taxes before paying common share dividends and after paying preferred share dividends) / total shareholders' equity = return on equity.

Let's say XYZ company's net income is $1.3 million. Its shareholder equity is $8 million. ROE is therefore 16.25%. The higher the ROE, the better the company is at generating profits using shareholder equity.

What's a Good ROE?

Return-on-equity or ROE is a metric used to analyze investment returns. It's a measure of how effectively a company uses shareholder equity to generate income. You might consider a good ROE to be one that increases steadily over time. This could indicate that a company does a good job using shareholder funds to increase profits. That can in turn increase shareholder value.

What Is Fundamental Analysis?

Fundamental analysis is the analysis of an investment or security to discover its true or intrinsic value. It involves the study of economic, industry, and company information. Fundamental analysis can be useful because an investor can determine if the security is fairly priced, overvalued, or undervalued by comparing its true value to its market value.

Fundamental analysis contrasts with technical analysis, which focuses on determining price action and uses different tools to do so, such as chart patterns and price trends.

Is a Higher or Lower P/E Ratio Better?

It depends on what you're looking for in an investment. A P/E ratio measures the relationship of a stock's price to earnings per share. A lower P/E ratio can indicate that a stock is undervalued and perhaps worth buying, but it could be low because the company isn't financially healthy.

A higher P/E can indicate that a stock is expensive, but that could be because the company is doing well and could continue to do so.

The best way to use P/E is often as a relative value comparison tool for stocks you're interested in, or you might want to compare the P/E of one or more stocks to an industry average.

The Bottom Line

Financial ratios can help you pick the best stocks for your portfolio and build your wealth. Dozens of financial ratios are used in fundamental analysis. We've briefly highlighted six of the most common and the easiest to calculate.

Remember that a company cannot be properly evaluated using just one ratio in isolation. Be sure to put a variety of ratios to use for more confident investment decision-making.

Introduction

As an expert and enthusiast, I have access to a wide range of information on various topics, including financial analysis and ratios used in investing. I can provide you with insights and explanations related to the concepts mentioned in the article you provided.

Ratios in Financial Analysis

Financial ratios are used to assess and compare the performance of companies. They provide valuable insights into a company's financial health and can help investors make informed decisions. Let's explore the six basic ratios mentioned in the article:

  1. Working Capital Ratio: The working capital ratio measures a company's ability to pay its short-term obligations using its current assets. It is calculated by dividing current assets by current liabilities. A ratio of 2 or higher indicates healthy liquidity, while a ratio of 1 or lower may suggest liquidity troubles.

  2. Quick Ratio: The quick ratio, also known as the acid test, is another measure of liquidity. It assesses a company's ability to pay its current liabilities with assets that can be quickly converted to cash. The quick ratio is calculated by subtracting inventory and prepaid expenses from current assets and then dividing the result by current liabilities. A quick ratio of less than 1 may indicate insufficient liquid assets to cover short-term liabilities.

  3. Earnings Per Share (EPS): EPS is a measure of a company's profitability and represents the portion of earnings allocated to each outstanding share of common stock. It is calculated by dividing net income by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding. A higher EPS generally indicates greater value.

  4. Price-Earnings Ratio (P/E): The P/E ratio is used to assess a stock's potential for growth. It compares a company's current stock price to its earnings per share. The P/E ratio is calculated by dividing the current stock price by the EPS. A lower P/E ratio may suggest an undervalued stock, while a higher P/E ratio may indicate an expensive stock.

  5. Debt-to-Equity Ratio: The debt-to-equity ratio measures the extent to which a company is financed by debt. It is calculated by dividing total liabilities by total shareholders' equity. A lower ratio indicates lower financial risk, while a higher ratio may suggest higher leverage and potential risk.

  6. Return on Equity (ROE): ROE measures a company's profitability and its ability to generate profits using shareholder equity. It is calculated by dividing net income by total shareholders' equity and expressing the result as a percentage. A higher ROE generally indicates better utilization of shareholder funds.

These ratios, when used in combination with other financial indicators and industry norms, can provide a comprehensive picture of a company's financial health and help investors make more informed investment decisions.

Conclusion

Financial ratios play a crucial role in fundamental analysis and can assist investors in evaluating a company's performance and making investment decisions. The six ratios mentioned in the article - working capital ratio, quick ratio, earnings per share (EPS), price-earnings (P/E) ratio, debt-to-equity ratio, and return on equity (ROE) - provide insights into liquidity, profitability, and financial risk. However, it's important to consider these ratios in conjunction with other factors and industry benchmarks for a more comprehensive analysis.

6 Basic Financial Ratios and What They Reveal (2024)
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